Wednesday, 20 July 2016

MKO’s Hope versus IBB’s Confusion


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IBB and MKO

Moshood’s main objective from April 19 to June 11, 1993, the period designated by the National Electoral Commission for campaigns, was to relate his message of change, under the slogan of Farewell to Poverty, to Nigeria’s 39,123,492 potential voters. He knew that he could not tour all the country’s 589 local governments, spread across thirty states, but he was determined to cover as much territory as possible. He soon compared his newly acquired aircraft to an overused taxi because he sometimes used it to reach as many as three states in a single day.

His opponent, Bashir Tofa of the National Republican Convention, who was from a prominent family in northern Nigeria, was a relatively unknown businessman. Moshood, who was unaware of how he had emerged as his party’s presidential candidate, nursed fears that he might have the backing of the military president. He decided, as a result, to double his efforts, and not to take anything for granted, in order to hand Tofa a crushing defeat. Toward this aim, before putting his machinery in full motion, Moshood set up his campaign office and named it Hope 93. He appointed Jonathan Silas Zwingina, an experienced man in electoral campaigns, as his Director General.

The Book that Cleared Bashorun MKO Abiola of all political blemishes
Hope, Moshood’s main theme, formed the basis of his campaign pledges. His primary goal as president, in a nutshell, was to provide solutions to people’s hopes for a bunch of things that included a better standard of living, more security, and better education. His mission would be to bring about change by making these hopes come true.

“His campaign, because of his generosity, had gradually turned into a big charity program and many of those he met, who were aware of his kind-hearted nature, saw his campaign as a chance to make all sorts of requests from him with reckless abandon. And they always got what they wanted. Before Moshood knew it, he had spent over $250 million dollars”.

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That was his message. And he spent a fortune-much more than his initial budget of $50 million-spreading it. The reasons that he spent so much were two. His campaign, because of his generosity, had gradually turned into a big charity program and many of those he met, who were aware of his kind-hearted nature, saw his campaign as a chance to make all sorts of requests from him with reckless abandon. And they always got what they wanted. Before Moshood knew it, he had spent over $250 million dollars.

The Author of the book 'The President Who Never Ruled, Jamiu Abiola & The GDA duringan interview session
There were also occasions, in which he received information that monies budgeted and distributed for campaign-related initiatives had been stolen, forcing him to have to provide additional funds immediately, depending on the importance of those initiatives.
His rising expenses, however, were not his only concern. He did not have a firm grip on his political party and this bothered him a lot. What made it more painful was that he held himself responsible for this development. He was desperate for allies after he had won the presidential primaries, and thus he allowed Yar’adua to nominate Tony Anenih, one of his close allies, as the chairman of the Social Democratic Party (SDP). Moshood should never have let that happen and would probably never have if he had had more experience in politics. The major consequence of this blunder was that he soon found himself alienated from his own party.

As his campaign started, Moshood reinforced his security apparatus. A professional company known as Corporate Guards, along with his ITT security guards of many years, beefed up security in his mansion. Aside from that, agents from the state security service, at the direction of the military government, were sent to guard him as well. Moshood never trusted them. He feared that they were spies.

IBB
From the onset, Moshood involved some of his wives in the campaign. He gave three of them strategic humanitarian roles to play. His hope was for them to reach out to women in rural areas and they did. Kudirat was in charge of northern Nigeria: Adebisi covered the west, while Doyin was to handle the east.

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They all did a thoroughly comprehensive job and Moshood was very proud of them.
As the campaigns advanced, it became clear that Moshood with over 250 traditional titles, hardly needed to be introduced wherever he went. Once he arrived at a rally, or any function everywhere in Nigeria, his presence was announced by his title before his name. This always automatically rekindled a bond that Moshood had previously shared with the host community when he was given the title many years ago. In most cases that further increased his credibility and gave him a strong edge over his opponent.

MKO & Kudi Abiola
The campaign, which was officially meant to last fifty-five days, was going smoothly until signs of uncertainty suddenly appeared .And to make matters worse, the military president, who was in a position to clarify things, became inaccessible.

(Excerpts from the book, The President Who Never Ruled by Jamiu Abiola; get copies in any book shop across the world or write Jamiu Abiola through jamiulinguist@yahoo.com. Read Rise of MKO’s hegemony & the distraction of IBB’s Dogs in our next post on this blog)

Gbenga Dan Asabe

Africa's Number One Celebrity Encounter Blog

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